Page Layout

Tasked with designing our own tabloid and broadsheet front pages to accompany our World War III report, we looked at page layout and the Pro’s and Con’s of various papers. Here are just some of the points which we came up with:

(T= Tabloid, B= Broadsheet, L= Local paper)

Pro’s

  • Easy to navigate (T)
  • 50/50 Image article (B)
  • Clean Cut (B)
  • In touch with news team (L)
  • Bold (B/T)

Con’s

  • Advertising- Full page adverts
  • Ink transfer
  • Size and scale (B)
  • Varied in use of colour/No conformity
  • Use of sexualising women etc.

After looking at newspapers from this age, we then compared them to a newspaper from August 5th 1914 (Daily News & Leader) to see how drastic the differences were. Below are some of the key findings:

  • Tiny Font
  • Only 8 pages long compared to 50/100 pages that make up todays newspapers
  • Heavily text-based
  • More pictures on the back of the Daily News & Leader with detailed descriptions for all
  • Lack of adverts on the front of the 1914 paper- more on back page though
  • Full page spread of war propaganda, ”ENGLISHMEN, DO YOUR DUTY & KEEP YOUR COUNTRY OUT OF A WICKED AND STUPID WAR.”
  • Spacing between articles is sparse and virtually non-existent
  • Black & White (Unlike todays colour copies)
  • Front page’s main story on left hand column
  • Artistic detail underneath headlines (Daily News & Leader)

The two links below show examples of the analysis of characters and breaking down the typography used. There are more than 20,000 different styles of typography- each with strengths that suit certain pieces of work:

Typography

Tracking…

Unit 51

Tabloid newspaper size: 430mm x 280mm

Key Terms                        Paper Size

Masthead: (A1)              594mm x 841mm

Lead Story: (A2)             420mm x 594mm

First Story: (A3)              297mm x 420mm

Second Story: (A4)         210mm x 297mm

Advert

Target Audience

Newspapers try to target certain audiences through the linguistics & topics of stories the newspaper includes:

  • Representation
  • Values
  • Politics
  • Institution
  • Language
  • Genre
  • Narrative
  • Ideology

Representation

It is how the audience is represented inside the newspaper by expressing their needs, interests & points of view.

Values

The quality, structure and content of a newspaper are adapted to the needs of a target audience.

Politics

Most newspapers support a certain political party, this means the content of the newspaper will be on the side of the party.

Language

The linguistics of newspapers can vary which demographic of an audience is to buy a newspaper. Semiotics/stereotypes can be applied when the language is either formal or informal.

Genre

The genre of a newspaper can depend on the content, design and opinions of the newspaper. Somebody may choose a newspaper on the content it includes.

Institution

Newspaper institutions are usually responsible for the production, publicity and distribution of a newspaper. The way this is done can influence how often who buys a newspaper.

Ideology

It is a set of aims, beliefs or morals a newspaper and audience shares. For example, Politics has become more involved in everybody’s lives, therefore this topic features often in newspapers. If the newspaper and audience share views, there is some loyalty they have towards each other.

Narratives

It is how a newspaper can be read in terms of text or format. Does a newspaper report its news in  certain way to support the interests of the target audience? Does the newspapers front page start with ‘soft’, ‘light-hearted’ or ‘hard-hitting’ news?

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